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Bluetooth headsets: Samsung HM1700 vs Plantonics M25

I had been using a Samsung HM1700 headset for over a year now. Recently, the Plantonics M25 was on sale. It looks a lot smaller, lighter and sleeker than the Samsung HM1700, it supports A2DP, it has long battery life, so I bought one to have a try.

The thing about Bluetooth headset is that you can never tell how well it works for you from the specs. You have to live with it for a week or two before you can tell if the two of you are compatible, sorta like a roommate or girlfriend. So I lived with the M25 for a week.

Samsung HM1700

Pros:
  • Long battery life
  • Great reception
Cons:
  • Bigger and heavier
  • Ear loop is not as comfortable
Plantonics M25

Pros:
  • Long battery life
  • Sleeker, smaller and lighter
  • Ear loop is fitting and comfortable
Cons:
  • Too many A2DP dropouts for my liking. By that, I mean the A2DP stream will drop out for a second or two being picking up again. This happens when I turn or bend my body, pick up a tool etc. It happens with the HM1700 too, but much less frequently.
So it seems like I will be sticking with the HM1700 for now and returning the M25. Let's hope something better comes along later at the same price point.

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