Skip to main content

Car Mirror Anti-Fog Film From Hell

Wife bought a set of anti-fog film for her car and asked me to help her apply them to the side mirrors. Turned out to be a really bad idea.

Firstly, it is difficult to get good clean results. If you have ever tried to apply film-based screen protectors for your smartphones or tablets, you know what I mean. You invariably get smudges or bubbles under the film, and the result does not look quite as nice as what they show in the photos. Furthermore, you are doing this outdoors, where dust is floating everywhere and invariably get caught under the film.

Secondly, and that's the most annoying part about this product, these things stick like crazy! Once they are on, they are impossible to pry off the mirror! I got a fright when I realized the little piece of cardboard that was provided did not make the film budge. Tried a credit card, and that didn't work either. Tried hair dryer on high mode, nothing. At that point, I was extremely frustrated! What kind of product-from-hell was this?

I googled frantically for a solution, and could not find anything that specifically mentioned how to get this product *off* (there were quite a few that showed you how to put it on though). A more generic search about how to get adhesives off mirrors suggested I could try a heat gun or a steam cleaner. It was the latter that I have at home, and that worked, but not without a lot of effort!
I had to blast the steam cleaner at one corner of the film, then immediately try to pry that corner off the mirror. It took a few tries before that corner would lift, and once that happened, it was possible to peel the entire film off the mirror.

In the end, I told my wife, no more sticky-film-from-hell for her car. I applied a spray of EnduroShield that I picked up from Aldi for $10, all in under 3 minutes.
Yes, it wears off after a few months, but it's quick to re-apply, AND easy to remove!

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Update: Line adapter for Ozito Blade Trimmer

Update (Dec 2021): If you access to a 3D printer, I would now recommend this solution , which makes it super easy to replace the trimmer line. I have been using it for a few months now with zero issue.

Attiny85 timer programming using Timer1

This Arduino sketch uses Timer1 to drive the LED blinker: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 /* * Program ATTiny85 to blink LED connected to PB1 at 1s interval. * Assumes ATTiny85 is running at 1MHz internal clock speed. */ #include <avr/io.h> #include <avr/wdt.h> #include <avr/sleep.h> #include <avr/interrupt.h> bool timer1 = false , led = true ; // Interrupt service routine for timer1 ISR(TIMER1_COMPA_vect) { timer1 = true ; } void setup() { // Setup output pins pinMode( 1 , OUTPUT); digitalWrite( 1 , led); set_sleep_mode(SLEEP_MODE_IDLE); // Setup timer1 to interrupt every second TCCR1 = 0 ; // Stop timer TCNT1 = 0 ; // Zero timer GTCCR = _BV(PSR1); // Reset prescaler OCR1A = 243 ; // T = prescaler / 1MHz = 0.004096s; OCR1A = (1s/T) - 1 = 243 OCR1C = 243 ; // Set to same value to reset timer1 to

3D Printer Filament Joiner

I have been looking at various ways of joining 3D printing filaments. One method involves running one end of a filament through a short PTFE tubing, melting it with a lighter or candle, retracting it back into the tubing and immediately plunging the filament to be fused into the tubing: One problem with this method is that you can't really control the temperature at which you melt the filament, so you frequently end up with a brittle joint that breaks upon the slightest bend. Aliexpress even sells a contraption that works along the same line. As it uses a lighter or candle as well, it suffers from the same weakness. I am not even sure why you need a special contraption when a short PTFE tubing will work just as well. Another method involves using shrink tubing/aluminium foil, and a heat gun: But a heat gun is rather expensive, so I wanted to explore other alternatives. The candle + PTFE tubing method actually works quite well when you happen to melt it at the rig